Bush League Justice in Judge Manfred Delong's Calgary Court

by Anthony J. Hall
Professor of Globalization Studies
University of Lethbridge
10 March, 2010

Judge Manfred Delong shut down the trial of Splitting The Sky versus George W. Bush on the second day of proceedings. The court denied STS his frequently emphasized request to have two witnesses give evidence in his defense. Those witnesses were myself and Cynthia McKinney. The trial came to an end just as Ms. McKinney arrived in Calgary from London. The US-based oil conglomerates active throughout Alberta form the core business constituency of the Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who represents a Calgary riding in Parliament.

The court accepted two documents as evidence for the defense. One is Gail Davidson's widely disseminated legal opinion for Lawyer's Against the War. STS and I studied this document closely in the days leading up to my friend being arrested for his arrest attempt. LAW's legal opinion highlighted some of the evidence, statutes and treaties to brand Bush as a "credibly accused war criminal" that should not be allowed into Canada. Prior to Bush's touching down in Calgary to address an audience of oil executives, Davidson's documemtation was distributed widely to officials of the Harper government and Canada's Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The other exhibit for the defense was my own paper that I originally presented at an invited academic venue at the University of Winnipeg. It has been published under a variety of titles on the Internet, including at Global Research.ca, 911 Blogger.com, 9/11 Truth.org and Voltairenet in both French and English. My initial title for it is "Bush League Justice: Should George W. Bush Be Arrested in Calgary Alberta and Tried for International Crimes."

Delong will deliver his ruling on June 7. The case for the prosecution both revealed and obscured much about the new police strategies being employed throughout North America to monitor, manage, divide and spin doctor demonstrators seeking to call attention to their political dissent. In my opinion the Crown's chief agent of prosecution, Tracy Davis, acted more as an advocate and defender of the police rather than as a representative of the Canadian people through Her Majesty as she is required to do according the constitutional tradition of the British Commonwealth.

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